How to Find the Right Editor, Part 4: Finding Your Editor

by Erin Brenner
You spend a lot of time sweating the small stuff in your manuscript, employing all the skills and gifts at your disposal. But at some point, you have to let someone else handle your copy. You have to hire an editor. In this series, we’ll explore how to find and hire the right editor for your manuscript.
In part four: where to find the right editor for you.

Where Should I Look for an Editor?

Personal recommendations are still the best way to find any service, including editing.

You can also check out sources that focus on editing or publishing. Editorial organizations, such as the Editorial Freelancers Association and Copyediting, have directories of members. MediaBistro is home to many media professionals, and FreelancerSwitch is a source of many kinds of freelancers, including editors. Katharine O’Moore-Klopf has a page of places editors can look for work; one may be right for you to post your job on.

General job boards are OK, but most job seekers there are looking for permanent work. It’s like finding a needle a haystack. Steer clear of bidding services, however. While it’s true you’ll pay lowest dollar, you’ll also get what you pay for.

Quality editors who know their stuff want to be paid a fair wage and don’t look for work on such sites. The EFA also posts a list of common rates; rates can vary wildly from industry to industry and based on experience, but the EFA is a good place to start.

In the end, you should feel comfortable with the person you choose to edit your copy. He should be professional, knowledgeable, and approachable. As with any other purchase, doing your homework pays off in quality and value.

If your current editor isn’t meeting your standards, give me a shout. I’ll be glad to help you out.

In This Series

This article originally appeared on The Writing Resource.