Upcoming Training with Erin Brenner!

Students love Erin’s teaching: “She clearly conveys the information and provides excellent feedback.” “Erin Brenner cares deeply about her students, and goes out of her way to encourage and support them. She is a wonderful teacher.” “Erin is a game-changer. Keep her. Just wow!”

Using Business Information to Increase Your Profits
June 8-9, 2019
Editors Canada
Do I charge enough? How many more clients do I need to make the money I want? Your editing business has a black box of information that will help you answer these questions and more. In this session, you’ll learn how to decode your business’s black box and what to do with the information to earn more while maintaining your sanity. And the math isn’t hard!

6 Responses to

  1. Mark McDaniel says:

    Erin, I hope you have time for a non-business question… and that you have mercy on an English teacher! My sophomores are writing that adverbs not only tell when, how, where, and to what extent but also… “why.” And they showed me this on several websites. I asked them for an example of this case. Can you give me a clear example?
    (Don’t worry—I’m not one of those teachers who only teach grammar for simple lesson planning. I teach it so they will understand what I’m saying about their writing.)

    • Erin Brenner says:

      Hi, Mark! No, I’ve never heard of adverbs that tell why. Adverb categories seemed to be fairly consistent across grammar theories. Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English‘s semantic categories for adverbs are pretty representative: place, time, manner, degree (consisting of amplifiers/intensifiers, diminishers/downtoners), additive/restrictive, stance (consisting of epistemic (e.g., certainty or doubt), attitude, and style), and linking (consisting of enumeration and addition, summation, apposition, result/inference, contrast/concession, transition).

      It’s possible they or the websites they’re referencing are parsing words that answer why as adverbs, while most grammarians would parse them differently. But without an example, I can’t imagine what that might be. If the students’ resources aren’t coming up with examples, then I’d say it’s not a provable theory and most likely incorrect.

      I hope that helps!

  2. Can anyone tell me the difference between the noun and Noun clause?

  3. Judy Lund says:

    You are going to think that this is some crackpot request, but I need help. I was a copy editor my whole career, which explains this quest. I am giving a talk in a few weeks about the author Peter May and his book, Blowback. And I want to talk about Michelin-starred restaurants. Is it a 3-star Michelin restaurant or a Michelin 3-star restaurant. I see it both ways but want to be correct. Please advise. Thank you. (I was a copyeditor in the Betty Crocker Kitchens for 32 years.)

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